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Besoek die aktiewe LitNet-platform by www.litnet.co.za

This is the LitNet archive (2006–2012)
Visit the active LitNet platform at www.litnet.co.za


 
Boeke | Books > Boekartikels | Articles on books

Boekartikels | Articles on books


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Dana-kragtoer tref Boland
Francois Verster - 2011-11-29
Dana Snyman en die musiekgroep Klopjag Die naweek van 26 en 27 November was besonders vir die Boland: Dana Snyman het die Saterdagoggend by Protea se boekwinkel op Stellenbosch gesels oor sy nuwe boek, Hiervandaan. En Sondagaand was dit weer hy, en die musiekgroep Klopjag, wat Bolanders naby Wellington vermaak het. Die naweek was omtrent ’n snoesige storie, knus tussen twee Dana-buiteblaaie verpak. By Protea Boekwinkel het Louis Esterhuizen iemand aangehaal: “Hiervandaan lees...

South African Literary Awards 2011
2011-11-23
The winners of the 2011 South African Literary Awards were announced last week. Read more about the winners and their work on the SALA website and on LitNet. | Die wenners van die 2011 South African Literary Awards is pas aangekondig. Nog inligting oor die skrywers en hul werk is beskikbaar op die SALA-webwerf en LitNet. Lifetime Achievement Literary Award: Chris Barnard Read a review of Chris Barnard’s novel Bundu here. Read more about Chris Barnard’s life and work here....

Antjie-Mankepantjie
Bibi Slippers - 2011-11-10
Untitled Document In 1985 (toe ek twee jaar oud was) het die boek verskyn wat my generasie sou vorm soos geen ander boek nie. Dit was amper soos Kerouac se On the road vir die Beat-generasie, net meer invloedryk, omdat ons op so ’n brose ouderdom daaraan blootgestel is. Die Beat-generasie was bemoei met jazz, dwelms en digkuns. Teen die tyd dat ons in die ‘80's gebore is, het jazz gevlug voor shoulder pads en popmusiek, en dwelms was ou nuus. Daar was darem nog die digkuns,...

Boeke laat mens toe om self filmregisseur te speel, keer op keer en onbeperk
Francois Verster - 2011-11-09
Untitled Document Daar is nou ’n advertensie op televisie wat handel oor die wonderwêreld van boeke, wat my bly maak, maar ook ’n bietjie treurig laat voel. Want eerstens identifiseer ek met dit wat die skepper daarvan sê: dat boeke die deure is waardeur ons in Narnia-wêrelde stap, maar meer nog, die spieël waarin Sneeuwitjie en Alice – en elkeen van ons – kyk om onsself te leer ken terwyl ons verbeeldingsmilieu’s verken. Maar daar is ’n...

Big Book Chain Chat #84: JM Coetzee in Texas
Rob Gaylard - 2011-11-04
Untitled Document JM Coetzee in Texas Isn’t it rather dismaying to learn that our (are we right to think of him as “our”?) foremost writer has sold his literary papers to the University of Texas in Austin? Of course Coetzee is free to choose what to do with his papers, and of course he belongs to the world, not just to South Africa, and yes, he did receive a doctorate from the University of Texas in 1965 – so this is not a criticism, just an expression of regret. Whatever...

Big Book Chain Chat #83: Where does poetry begin?
Kyle Allen - 2011-10-26
Where does poetry begin? Poetry begins in silence and transcends ourselves. A poem is both a message and a destination. A poem is both a process and an entirety. We are channels and also embodiers of the poem. Where does the poem end and another existence begin? And yet the poem is separate from us. As soon as we write or speak it takes on new life, like a child. Should there be a message in poetry? Poetry is the message. Poetry is our consciousness extended and revealed. It is a revelation of...

Cor Dirks se Uile is terug in ’n nuwe eeu
Danie Botha - 2011-10-20
Die Uile van Kranskop Cor Dirks Publisher: Protea Boekhuis ISBN: 9781869194345 Price: R100.95 Die Uile en die rampokkers Cor Dirks Publisher: Protea Boekhuis ISBN: 9781869194420 Price: R110.95 Breuk onder die Uile Cor Dirks Publisher: Protea Boekhuis ISBN: 9781869194505 Price: R100.95 Onder ons wat nou aan die begin is van ons seniorburger-jare sal daar diegene wees wat sal terugdink aan Cor Dirks se Uile-reeks, hoe dit hulle aan die lees gesit het en van die jare vyftig...

Big Book Chain Chat #82: Facing the future
Judy Croome - 2011-10-13
My name is Judy. I am a bookaholic. I’ll buy a book I don’t need (and will probably never read) because I love the smell, the feel, the sight of it. I was the kind of person who threw out clothes to make cupboard space to store more books. Until, that is, I discovered a new addiction: e-books. At first, I resisted their seductive call. Oh yes, I put up a good fight. I want a book to feel like a book, I said. A real book is printed on paper, I insisted. A book, I lamented, inhaling...

Big Book Chain Chat #81: “The past is another country ...” – Clive Algar on writing about the past in fiction
Clive Algar - 2011-10-06
It was a bizarre but enjoyable experience for me to see my first novel, Journeys to the End of the World, on display in the bookshops in 2007, a few days after my 65th birthday. And when the reviews started coming in, with critics calling it “spellbinding”, “haunting”, and “riveting”, I decided that the experiment had been worthwhile, and that I would start work on my second one right away. Although creative writing had always been my ambition, a busy career...

Big Book Chain Chat #81: The Past is Another Country – Writing about the past in fiction
Clive Algar - 2011-10-06
Another brilliant day for writing. The clouds are full and hanging low. There is something electric in the air. The intoxicating smell of coffee drifts across my laptop screen. Patrons are coming and going, stopping and walking, carrying on. This is fantastic, because people, everyday people, being as mundane as they can be, supply an author with ample characteristics and mannerisms and body language. This is what it’s all about. I take a deep breath and time myself, initiating what most would...

Big Book Chain Chat #80: The right time to write
James Fouche - 2011-09-29
Untitled Document Another brilliant day for writing. The clouds are full and hanging low. There is something electric in the air. The intoxicating smell of coffee drifts across my laptop screen. Patrons are coming and going, stopping and walking, carrying on. This is fantastic, because people, everyday people, being as mundane as they can be, supply an author with ample characteristics and mannerisms and body language. This is what it’s all about. I take a deep breath and time myself, initiating...

Open Book Report: 2 parts inspiration, 1 part Sunday blues
Bibi Slippers - 2011-09-29
Untitled Document Considering the current state of South African politics I felt deeply privileged to have attended two sessions at the Open Book Festival on Sunday, 25th September which left me hopeful and (almost) positive about the future. First up was Alex Perry’s conversation with Moeletsi Mbeki, editor of Advocates for Change. Mbeki, author of the bestselling Architects of Poverty, addresses the flipside of the coin in this new book, a collection of essays by experts from across the...

Open Book Report: Forthcoming attractions 3
Bibi Slippers - 2011-09-28
One of the worst things about becoming a grown-up is that there’s no more story time. That is, no more story time unless there’s a Book Festival in town! Forthcoming Attractions 3 featured readings by celebrated South African and international authors. Damon Galgut, Paul Harding, Rustum Kozain and Neel Mukherjee shared extracts from works in progress. Damon Galgut read with gusto and even went as far as doing his characters’ accents. Paul Harding’s reading told the story...

Open Book Report: Earl Lovelace and Etienne van Heerden in conversation
Bibi Slippers - 2011-09-28
Earl Lovelace, celebrated author from Trinidad, and well-known South African author Etienne van Heerden took part in the Free the Word PEN Dialogue at the Open Book Festival in Cape Town on Thursday, 22nd September 2011. Lynda Gilfillan chaired this discussion, which centred on the books Salt (Lovelace) and 30 Nights in Amsterdam (Van Heerden), and in which the authors discussed the problematic notions of nationhood and postcolonialism. Lovelace expressed his disapproval of the term postcolonial,...

Open Book-verslag: Eerste versamelinge
Bibi Slippers - 2011-09-28
Vier digters in verskillende fases van hul literêre loopbane, saam drie debuutbundels, ’n tweede bundel van een digter op pad, en een tema op almal se lippe: die angs en ekstase van ’n eerste digbundel. Rustum Kozain, Jasper van Zyl, Andries Samuel en Bibi Slippers het met die gehoor gepraat oor die spesifieke angs wat hulle ervaar het met die publikasie van hul eerste bundels, of (in die geval van Slippers) die angs in die proses van skryf aan die eerste bundel. Kozain, wie se...

Big Book Chain Chat #79: Short, Sharp & Snappy
Robin Malan - 2011-09-21
Untitled Document “If I see another modern adaptation of a fairy tale, I’ll scream!” Teachers who have to do with school theatre have been having it tough lately. Why? Well, no one wants to inflict on school students the “hoary old chestnuts”, those dreadful one-act plays like The Monkey’s Paw and The Bishop’s Candlesticks that seem to have been around for centuries. Nor, it seems from the heartfelt cry of one teacher, endless sub-Thurberesque “hip”...

Independent Publishers: How do they survive?
Janet van Eeden - 2011-09-20
For some years I’ve wondered how on earth publishers survive in this less than literary country. Perhaps the one or two bestsellers like Spud can make up for the years of publishing books which won’t necessarily do as well. Then I began to think about independent publishers. How on earth do they manage to make ends meet when they have no back-up or a large stable of books to carry them through the tough times? put these questions to Robin Malan, sole proprietor of Junkets Publisher. ...

Roepman in die Kloof, met Jan
Francois Verster - 2011-09-20
Untitled Document Vriende van ons is entoesiastiese ondersteuners van gereelde kultuurgeleenthede op die Bolandse plaas Koopmanskloof. En dis hulle wat ons saamnooi na ’n boek- en filmbespreking daar: Jan van Tonder sal ons oor Roepman vertel. Die plaas lê styf teen die blad van ’n koppie wat ’n entjie weg van Bottelarypad verby loop en ons ry met ’n hobbelrige paadjie tussen bome deur terwyl dit vinnig donker word. By ’n vurk in die pad onthou ons net betyds...

Skool gaan met Theo hopelik nog ver loop
Francois Verster - 2011-09-16
In die saaltjie agter die Breytenbach-huis in Wellington met sy tekeninge en aanhalings teen die mure weerskante ’n eklektiese versameling stoele is ’n verhogie met ’n swartgeverfde agtergrond en ’n groot bos blomme. Die blomme is meestal pienk, dieselfde pienk van die enkele kussing op ’n turkoois rusbank langs sy maat, ’n ewekleurige leunstoel. Uit die dakluidsprekers rol die ronde, warm klanke van kitaarmusiek terwyl mense stadig by die deur insypel en algaande...

Women writing for women during Women’s Month III
Arja Salafranca - 2011-08-30
I’ve read two enormously different, but equally moving books in the past weeks – both of which reflect and affirm what I wish for women this month, and in particular women writers. The first was Reclaiming the L-Word: Sappho’s Daughters Out in Africa, edited by Alleyn Diesel (Modjaji Books 2011) and the second was Julia Cameron’s autobiography, Floor Sample: A Creative Memoir (Cameron of The Artist’s Way fame). The same week I was reading Reclaiming the L-Word I was...

JC (Kay) de Villiers, author of Healers, helpers and hospitals in conversation
Paul Murray - 2011-08-17
Untitled Document Healers, helpers and Hospitals – A History of Military Medicine in the Anglo-Boer War Volumes I and Volume II Author: JC (Kay) de Villiers Publisher: Protea Book House, Pretoria ISBN: 9781869192777 Price: R600.95 Order: proteaboek@mweb.co.za Click here to buy a copy from Kalahari.net! Paul Murray recently interviewed JC de Villiers for LitNet. De Villiers recently won the UCT Book Award for Healers, helpers and hospitals, a book with a medical focus on the Anglo-Boer...

Women writing for women during Women’s Month II
Caroline Smart, Trish Holdengarde, Sue Rakoczy IHM - 2011-08-17
Untitled Document Caroline Smart, voice coach (speech), actress, director, arts journalist and theatre/dance judge. No progress can be made in any field by being dictatorial, offensive or patronising. The quality of communication is immeasurable and I would urge every woman to empower herself with this skill – to gain the capacity to teach, inform, criticise or analyse in a way that is positive rather than negative. Trish Holdengarde, strategic business intuitive, intuitive coach and businesswoman...

Big Book Chain Chat #78 Young Adult Fiction: Character, character, character (but think again if you’d like to get published)
Naomi Meyer - 2011-08-17
Untitled Document Maya Fowler, SA Partridge and Izak de Vries all recently supplied this forum with a wealth of thoughts regarding Young Adult Fiction. Fowler and Partridge respectively wrote about the aspects of pop culture in this genre and De Vries questioned the need for the existence of a distinction between young adult fiction and adult fiction. All three contributions are stimulating material for any reader, regardless of their interest in young adult fiction per se. With regard to De Vries’s...

Koop-’n-Afrikaanse-boek-dag: Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk inspireer
Helena Gunter - 2011-08-12
Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk die meeste beïnvloed of geïnspireer, en hoekom? Missionaris deur Elsa Joubert en Verkenning deur Karel Schoeman het my bewus gemaak van die uitwerking wat Europese kolonisasie op die vasteland van Afrika het. Ek het beide boeke destyds gelees as ironiese kommentaar op die sogenaamde voorspoed en vooruitgang wat Westerse kerstening en beskawing na Afrika gebring het. Die ontheemding, verstrooiing en ontmensliking van die destydse inheemse...

Koop-’n-Afrikaanse-boek-dag: Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk inspireer
Annemari Coetser - 2011-08-12
Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk die meeste beïnvloed of geïnspireer, en hoekom? Eish ... Dalk die eerste Afrikaanse boek wat ek as kind in my hande gehou het? Miskien Sus en Daan? Die Afrikaanse Kinderensiklopedie? Geen enkele skrywer kan aanspreeklik gehou word vir hierdie obsessie waaraan ek gelukkig ly nie. Dalk was dit ’n greep uit Langenhoven se Versamelde Werke of ’n knypie uit FA Venter se boeke wat my lees- en skryflus aangewakker het. Miskien het Eitemalof...

Koop-’n-Afrikaanse-boek-dag: Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk inspireer
Gerrit Rautenbach - 2011-08-12
Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk die meeste beïnvloed of geïnspireer, en hoekom? Ag nee toe, julle kan dit mos nie aan ’n mens doen nie! Een boek? Ek kan nie eers net een skrywer uitsonder nie. Ek lees dan nog my hele lewe lank meer as een boek op ’n slag. Maar in my vormingsjare het ek PJ Schoeman, PH Nortje en Doc Immelman raakgelees. En daardeur het ek reis in woordvorm ontdek. Die magiese van nuwe bestemmings. En die stories daaroor. Ek wou ook eendag sulke...

Koop-’n-Afrikaanse-boek-dag: Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk inspireer
Anoeschka von Meck - 2011-08-12
Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk die meeste beïnvloed of geïnspireer, en hoekom? Sonder om te diep te dink, sou ek sê Alba Bouwer se Abdoltjie. Dit het op my as kind en selfs as grootmens 'n magiese impak omdat dit 'n eenvoudige dog egte wêreld skep waarin die fantasie-elemente net so natuurlik soos die res van die storie aangebied word. Teen die tyd dat die storie klaarmaak, is jy saam op daai donkiekarretjie, met die maan wat soos 'n sny pampoen oor jou kop...

Koop-’n-Afrikaanse-boek-dag: Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk inspireer
Zandra Bezuidenhout - 2011-08-12
Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk die meeste beïnvloed of geïnspireer, en hoekom? NP Van Wyk Louw se bundel Tristia het my kop finaal in die rigting van die poësie gedraai. DJ Opperman het dié bundel met ons behandel en ek het begin verstaan wat groot poësie is, en wat dit kan doen. Tristia bly vir my 'n ykpunt. Al lyk die hedendaagse digkuns heelwat anders, lees ek steeds gedigte in die hoop dat dit 'n Tristia-ervaring sal bring; daardie duiselende oomblik...

Koop-’n-Afrikaanse-boek-dag: Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk inspireer
Malene Breytenbach - 2011-08-12
Watter Afrikaanse boek het jou skryfwerk die meeste beïnvloed of geïnspireer, en hoekom? Ek kan nie slegs een Afrikaanse boek uitsonder wat my geïnspireer of beïnvloed het nie. Die werk van sekere skrywers het dit kollektief gedoen. Aanvanklik het ek my verbeel ek kan nie eintlik in Afrikaans skryf nie, maar dit was ’n uitdaging. Ek het begin deur ’n romanse in Afrikaans te pleeg en dit is gepubliseer. Toenemend agtergekom ek kan dit doen, my taal verbeter en...

Women writing for women during Women’s Month I
Andie Miller - 2011-08-11
Untitled Document Statistics show that women and children (especially female children) in South Africa endure more abuse of human rights than any other individuals in this country. Despite the lofty maxims of our Constitution proclaiming equal rights for women, giving them respect and allowing them to be as safe as their male counterparts seems like a far-off dream to many women in this country. Have we really come so far from the 1800s when philosophers like Jean Jacques Rousseau declared that...

Big Book Chain Chat #77 Young Adult Fiction: What Makes YA Fiction YA?
Lauri Kubuitsile - 2011-08-11
Untitled Document As a writer of books for children and young adults I’ve read with interest the recent discussions in the South African book world about young adult fiction. Maya Fowler and Sally Partridge both ask if timely, trendy references are needed to make young adult fiction pertinent to that generation. Both of them come to the conclusion that no, they are not, and I agree. It reminded me of a session I attended at the Cape Town Book Fair, where British YA writer Kevin Brooks was...

Big Book Chain Chat #76 Young Adult Fiction: “Youth novels” are unlikely to ensure a comfortable retirement home for their creators
Derick van der Walt - 2011-08-11
Untitled Document Pondering the concept youth novel during the past few years I have been amazed to discover that nobody really knows exactly what the concept entails. People really don’t. Not the publishers, and certainly not the teachers who are responsible for cultivating the dying art of reading books among the people who will, in future, make watershed decisions about global warming, the classical concept of democracy and how to feed the poor. (And, of course, how much they would be...

Big Book Chain Chat #75 Young Adult Fiction: Write for the reader, not the age
Carina Diedericks-Hugo - 2011-08-11
Untitled Document It is with much delight that I have been following the discussions on books for young people. The genre seldom enjoys lively debate on the intricacies of writing for a market that is harder to pinpoint than Malema’s finances. I have been in the business for ten years and have laboured through 16 of my own YA books. As a publisher I have published more than 300 books for children and YAs. In fact, I have the honour of being able to claim the title as Sally Partridge’s...

Big Book Chain Chat #74 Young Adult Fiction: Give us a good story!
Izak de Vries - 2011-08-10
Untitled Document This forum has recently published two thought-provoking articles on writing for young adults by two authors of that genre. The first was by Maya Fowler (“Some thoughts on writing youth novels”) and the more recent one by SA Partridge (“Pop culture and context in young adult fiction”). Both asked, and addressed, the question of pop art in young adult fiction. A summary of their views will not do justice to them, so I urge the reader to read their respective...

Big Book Chain Chat #73 Young Adult Fiction: Pop culture and context in young adult fiction
SA Partridge - 2011-08-10
Untitled Document I came across fellow youth writer Maya Fowler’s piece on writing for youth (#25 Some thoughts on writing youth novels) and she made some very interesting points about pop culture: I’m not keen to populate my fiction with Hannah Montana-type characters or references to Jay-Z and the gang. But one can’t help feeling you should, just to get through … By adding that much of pop culture, mightn’t one overpopulate the work with detail in the same way...

Poetry: South African women writing their bodies
Gillian Schutte - 2011-08-10
Untitled Document There has been a proliferation of poetry coming out of South Africa over the past few years – and much of this poetry has been scribed by women writing their bodies. From the wants and needs of their vaginas to the conflicting emotions that a period may bring on, to the inner stirrings of desire and lust – women are writing it all down and lots of it is getting published. Says award-winning poet Arja Salafranca: “I think some of this has been due to the really...

Big Book Chain Chat #72 About writing memoirs and other things
Julian de Wette - 2011-07-20
Untitled Document Is apartheid a laughing matter? Set in 1960s South Africa, Prime Minister Verwoerd's assassination resonates throughout my novel, A Case of Knives, in which fictional Prime Minister Sybrand Schoon is murdered. The butler, Cyprian Molinieux, changed his racial classification from White to Coloured in order to marry a Coloured nanny. His love is unrequited and his subsequent attempts to regain his “European” identity drives him over the edge. He blames Schoon, the Prime...

Karen Lazar, author of Hemispheres – Inside a Stroke, in conversation with Janet van Eeden
Janet van Eeden - 2011-07-15
Title: Hemispheres – Inside a StrokeAuthor: Karen Lazar Publisher: Modjaji BooksISBN: 9781920397241 Click here to buy a copy from Kalahari.net. Review by Janet van Eeden Hemispheres – Inside a Stroke is another brave publication from Modjaji Books. Once again a woman whose life experiences are beyond the norm has been given a voice and Modjaji should be commended for continuing to showcase these unusual stories. Commendation is due even more to the author of this collection...

Clive Lawrance and My Barbados Hat
Janet van Eeden - 2011-06-30
Untitled Document Clive Lawrance’s new collection of poetry begins with a quote from WB Yeats: “Why should not old men be mad?” It’s a good question, one Lawrance feels in a position to answer. Now that he is in his seventies he doesn’t feel the need to justify what he does. Not that he ever did, mind. It’s just that his latest collection of poetry is his most honest, his most personal, and it is, as anything is that Lawrance does, unapologetic. “In the...

Independent Publishers: How do they survive?
Janet van Eeden - 2011-06-28
Untitled Document For some years I’ve wondered how on earth publishers survive in this less than literary country. Perhaps the one or two bestsellers like Spud can make up for the years of publishing books which won’t necessarily do as well. Then I began to think about independent publishers. How on earth do they manage to make ends meet when they have no back-up or a large stable of books to carry them through the tough times? I put these questions to Moira Richards and Norman Darlington,...

Big Book Chain Chat #71: VS Naipaul versus the World: Roses, thorns and dealing with pricks
Jonathan Amid - 2011-06-24
As I was reading the recent comments made about women’s writing and women writers by one VS Naipaul, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature no less, a quote from William Shakespeare’s beloved Romeo and Juliet came to mind: “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” When I heard what Naipaul had uttered about women’s writing and Jane Austen in particular, I was displeased to say the least. But was I shocked, surprised,...

100 Best books – readers’ vote as reflected in Cape Librarian
Francois Verster - 2011-06-22
Click here to view a list of the top 100 books of the past decade I’ve just got hold of the provincial library services magazine Cape Librarian (March/April edition) – as usual very interesting reading. According to a poll (2 000 library users were asked) the top 100 books of the past decade were listed in this edition. Of these 100 books I have read only eight. That was my first surprise. Twelve of them I still want to read – too many books ...And then I tried to recognise...

Big Book Chain Chat #70: VS Naipaul – a man from another time
Mike Rands - 2011-06-21
Untitled Document When Osama bin Laden was finally killed the Americans partied. From coast to coast they sang and danced and declared that it was a “great day to be alive”. People across the globe added their voices to the chorus. I was ashamed to be a human. In the quest for finding the bogeyman the greatest power the world has ever known bankrupted itself. Countries were plunged into war, and hundreds of thousands of people lost their lives. The man with the long beard and the...

Independent Publishers: How do they survive?
Janet van Eeden - 2011-06-21
Untitled Document Janet van Eeden in conversation with Mindy Stanford, Mariss Stevens and Crystal Warren of Aerial Publishing, a community publisher For some years I’ve wondered how on earth publishers survive in this less than literary country. Perhaps the one or two bestsellers like Spud can make up for the years of publishing books which won’t necessarily do as well. Then I began to think about independent publishers. How on earth do they manage to make ends meet when they have no...

Big Book Chain Chat #69: VS Naipaul’s recent rant – The last gasp of a moribund mindset
Fiona Snyckers - 2011-06-17
When something happens in the literary world that stirs me, I take to my blog at once. I find I can’t rest until my swirl of thoughts has been tamed, ordered and laid down neatly on the page. VS Naipaul’s recent rant against women writers was not one of these stirring events. I felt absolutely no compulsion to respond to it. Beyond a few moments of shocked incredulity, I stopped thinking about it almost at once. A few days later I read with great pleasure and amusement Finuala Dowling’s...

Big Book Chain Chat #68: Naipaul’s temerity carves into the heart of the matter
Janka Steenkamp - 2011-06-17
Upon reading VS Naipaul’s utterances about his clairvoyant ability to distinguish a writer’s gender by simply reading a paragraph, I was shocked beyond the realm of language; was this Nobel Prize for Literature winner really echoing Sir Robert Southey’s letter to Charlotte Brontë from 1837 who famously said, “Literature cannot be the business of a woman’s life, and ought not to be”? It would be ludicrously obvious to jump on to a feminist horse at this juncture...

Big Book Chain Chat #67: VS Naipaul's phallocratic utterances – Has he done us a favour by default?
Gillian Schutte - 2011-06-14
Untitled Document Well I’ll be damned, the blasted old bigot VS Naipaul has done it again. No stranger to literary spats and barneys, he seems to have little regard for current politically correct social norms, preferring the masculine “say it like it is” inclination of yesteryear. Not so long ago he disparaged all things African. This time the winner of the Nobel Prize for literature has lashed out at female authors, saying there is no woman writer whom he considers his equal...

Shortlist spotlight: M-Net Literary Awards 2011
2011-06-10
Shortlist: Category EnglishM-Net Literary Awards 2011 A selection of LitNet articles about the shortlisted books and writers Zoo City Lauren Beukes • Interview: Lauren Beukes on the SF tag and winning the British Arthur C Clark Award • Inter-review: Strap on your seatbelts – Janet van Eeden chats to Zoo City author Lauren Beukes • World Book Day: What made you fall in love with books? In a Strange Room Damon Galgut • We object: “I...

Kortlys-fokus: M-Net Literêre Toekennings 2011
2011-06-10
Kortlys: Kategorie AfrikaansM-Net Literêre Toekennings 2011 ’n Keur LitNet-artikels oor die gekortlyste skrywers en boeke Afstande Dan Sleigh • Resensie: Afstande is heilsame opvoeding en ’n onmisbare leeservaring• Resensie: Afstande – baie vleis aan been, maar te min murg • LitNet | ATKV Skrywersalbum:Dan Sleigh (1938–) Marike se laaste dans Deborah Steinmair • Uittreksel: Marike se laaste dans • Resensie:...

Photos: Sunday Times Literary Awards 2011 – shortlist announcement
Imke van Heerden - 2011-05-27
Many of South Africa’s literary greats and book lovers alike all gathered in Franschhoek mid-May for the shortlist announcement of the country’s pre-eminent literary accolade, the Sunday Times Literary Awards 2011. Click here for the shortlists. Click here for Q&A's with the shortlisted writers Some of the writers/publishers that attended the event (clockwise, from top left): Arja Salafranca, Leslie Swartz, Eugene Ashton, Robert Plummer, Henrietta Rose-Innes,...


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