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Visit the active LitNet platform at www.litnet.co.za


 
Boeke | Books > Boekartikels | Articles on books > English

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South African Literary Awards 2011
2011-11-23
The winners of the 2011 South African Literary Awards were announced last week. Read more about the winners and their work on the SALA website and on LitNet. | Die wenners van die 2011 South African Literary Awards is pas aangekondig. Nog inligting oor die skrywers en hul werk is beskikbaar op die SALA-webwerf en LitNet. Lifetime Achievement Literary Award: Chris Barnard Read a review of Chris Barnard’s novel Bundu here. Read more about Chris Barnard’s life and work here....

Big Book Chain Chat #84: JM Coetzee in Texas
Rob Gaylard - 2011-11-04
Untitled Document JM Coetzee in Texas Isn’t it rather dismaying to learn that our (are we right to think of him as “our”?) foremost writer has sold his literary papers to the University of Texas in Austin? Of course Coetzee is free to choose what to do with his papers, and of course he belongs to the world, not just to South Africa, and yes, he did receive a doctorate from the University of Texas in 1965 – so this is not a criticism, just an expression of regret. Whatever...

Big Book Chain Chat #83: Where does poetry begin?
Kyle Allen - 2011-10-26
Where does poetry begin? Poetry begins in silence and transcends ourselves. A poem is both a message and a destination. A poem is both a process and an entirety. We are channels and also embodiers of the poem. Where does the poem end and another existence begin? And yet the poem is separate from us. As soon as we write or speak it takes on new life, like a child. Should there be a message in poetry? Poetry is the message. Poetry is our consciousness extended and revealed. It is a revelation of...

Big Book Chain Chat #82: Facing the future
Judy Croome - 2011-10-13
My name is Judy. I am a bookaholic. I’ll buy a book I don’t need (and will probably never read) because I love the smell, the feel, the sight of it. I was the kind of person who threw out clothes to make cupboard space to store more books. Until, that is, I discovered a new addiction: e-books. At first, I resisted their seductive call. Oh yes, I put up a good fight. I want a book to feel like a book, I said. A real book is printed on paper, I insisted. A book, I lamented, inhaling...

Big Book Chain Chat #81: “The past is another country ...” – Clive Algar on writing about the past in fiction
Clive Algar - 2011-10-06
It was a bizarre but enjoyable experience for me to see my first novel, Journeys to the End of the World, on display in the bookshops in 2007, a few days after my 65th birthday. And when the reviews started coming in, with critics calling it “spellbinding”, “haunting”, and “riveting”, I decided that the experiment had been worthwhile, and that I would start work on my second one right away. Although creative writing had always been my ambition, a busy career...

Big Book Chain Chat #81: The Past is Another Country – Writing about the past in fiction
Clive Algar - 2011-10-06
Another brilliant day for writing. The clouds are full and hanging low. There is something electric in the air. The intoxicating smell of coffee drifts across my laptop screen. Patrons are coming and going, stopping and walking, carrying on. This is fantastic, because people, everyday people, being as mundane as they can be, supply an author with ample characteristics and mannerisms and body language. This is what it’s all about. I take a deep breath and time myself, initiating what most would...

Big Book Chain Chat #80: The right time to write
James Fouche - 2011-09-29
Untitled Document Another brilliant day for writing. The clouds are full and hanging low. There is something electric in the air. The intoxicating smell of coffee drifts across my laptop screen. Patrons are coming and going, stopping and walking, carrying on. This is fantastic, because people, everyday people, being as mundane as they can be, supply an author with ample characteristics and mannerisms and body language. This is what it’s all about. I take a deep breath and time myself, initiating...

Open Book Report: 2 parts inspiration, 1 part Sunday blues
Bibi Slippers - 2011-09-29
Untitled Document Considering the current state of South African politics I felt deeply privileged to have attended two sessions at the Open Book Festival on Sunday, 25th September which left me hopeful and (almost) positive about the future. First up was Alex Perry’s conversation with Moeletsi Mbeki, editor of Advocates for Change. Mbeki, author of the bestselling Architects of Poverty, addresses the flipside of the coin in this new book, a collection of essays by experts from across the...

Open Book Report: Forthcoming attractions 3
Bibi Slippers - 2011-09-28
One of the worst things about becoming a grown-up is that there’s no more story time. That is, no more story time unless there’s a Book Festival in town! Forthcoming Attractions 3 featured readings by celebrated South African and international authors. Damon Galgut, Paul Harding, Rustum Kozain and Neel Mukherjee shared extracts from works in progress. Damon Galgut read with gusto and even went as far as doing his characters’ accents. Paul Harding’s reading told the story...

Open Book Report: Earl Lovelace and Etienne van Heerden in conversation
Bibi Slippers - 2011-09-28
Earl Lovelace, celebrated author from Trinidad, and well-known South African author Etienne van Heerden took part in the Free the Word PEN Dialogue at the Open Book Festival in Cape Town on Thursday, 22nd September 2011. Lynda Gilfillan chaired this discussion, which centred on the books Salt (Lovelace) and 30 Nights in Amsterdam (Van Heerden), and in which the authors discussed the problematic notions of nationhood and postcolonialism. Lovelace expressed his disapproval of the term postcolonial,...

Big Book Chain Chat #79: Short, Sharp & Snappy
Robin Malan - 2011-09-21
Untitled Document “If I see another modern adaptation of a fairy tale, I’ll scream!” Teachers who have to do with school theatre have been having it tough lately. Why? Well, no one wants to inflict on school students the “hoary old chestnuts”, those dreadful one-act plays like The Monkey’s Paw and The Bishop’s Candlesticks that seem to have been around for centuries. Nor, it seems from the heartfelt cry of one teacher, endless sub-Thurberesque “hip”...

Independent Publishers: How do they survive?
Janet van Eeden - 2011-09-20
For some years I’ve wondered how on earth publishers survive in this less than literary country. Perhaps the one or two bestsellers like Spud can make up for the years of publishing books which won’t necessarily do as well. Then I began to think about independent publishers. How on earth do they manage to make ends meet when they have no back-up or a large stable of books to carry them through the tough times? put these questions to Robin Malan, sole proprietor of Junkets Publisher. ...

Women writing for women during Women’s Month III
Arja Salafranca - 2011-08-30
I’ve read two enormously different, but equally moving books in the past weeks – both of which reflect and affirm what I wish for women this month, and in particular women writers. The first was Reclaiming the L-Word: Sappho’s Daughters Out in Africa, edited by Alleyn Diesel (Modjaji Books 2011) and the second was Julia Cameron’s autobiography, Floor Sample: A Creative Memoir (Cameron of The Artist’s Way fame). The same week I was reading Reclaiming the L-Word I was...

JC (Kay) de Villiers, author of Healers, helpers and hospitals in conversation
Paul Murray - 2011-08-17
Untitled Document Healers, helpers and Hospitals – A History of Military Medicine in the Anglo-Boer War Volumes I and Volume II Author: JC (Kay) de Villiers Publisher: Protea Book House, Pretoria ISBN: 9781869192777 Price: R600.95 Order: proteaboek@mweb.co.za Click here to buy a copy from Kalahari.net! Paul Murray recently interviewed JC de Villiers for LitNet. De Villiers recently won the UCT Book Award for Healers, helpers and hospitals, a book with a medical focus on the Anglo-Boer...

Women writing for women during Women’s Month II
Caroline Smart, Trish Holdengarde, Sue Rakoczy IHM - 2011-08-17
Untitled Document Caroline Smart, voice coach (speech), actress, director, arts journalist and theatre/dance judge. No progress can be made in any field by being dictatorial, offensive or patronising. The quality of communication is immeasurable and I would urge every woman to empower herself with this skill – to gain the capacity to teach, inform, criticise or analyse in a way that is positive rather than negative. Trish Holdengarde, strategic business intuitive, intuitive coach and businesswoman...

Big Book Chain Chat #78 Young Adult Fiction: Character, character, character (but think again if you’d like to get published)
Naomi Meyer - 2011-08-17
Untitled Document Maya Fowler, SA Partridge and Izak de Vries all recently supplied this forum with a wealth of thoughts regarding Young Adult Fiction. Fowler and Partridge respectively wrote about the aspects of pop culture in this genre and De Vries questioned the need for the existence of a distinction between young adult fiction and adult fiction. All three contributions are stimulating material for any reader, regardless of their interest in young adult fiction per se. With regard to De Vries’s...

Women writing for women during Women’s Month I
Andie Miller - 2011-08-11
Untitled Document Statistics show that women and children (especially female children) in South Africa endure more abuse of human rights than any other individuals in this country. Despite the lofty maxims of our Constitution proclaiming equal rights for women, giving them respect and allowing them to be as safe as their male counterparts seems like a far-off dream to many women in this country. Have we really come so far from the 1800s when philosophers like Jean Jacques Rousseau declared that...

Big Book Chain Chat #77 Young Adult Fiction: What Makes YA Fiction YA?
Lauri Kubuitsile - 2011-08-11
Untitled Document As a writer of books for children and young adults I’ve read with interest the recent discussions in the South African book world about young adult fiction. Maya Fowler and Sally Partridge both ask if timely, trendy references are needed to make young adult fiction pertinent to that generation. Both of them come to the conclusion that no, they are not, and I agree. It reminded me of a session I attended at the Cape Town Book Fair, where British YA writer Kevin Brooks was...

Big Book Chain Chat #76 Young Adult Fiction: “Youth novels” are unlikely to ensure a comfortable retirement home for their creators
Derick van der Walt - 2011-08-11
Untitled Document Pondering the concept youth novel during the past few years I have been amazed to discover that nobody really knows exactly what the concept entails. People really don’t. Not the publishers, and certainly not the teachers who are responsible for cultivating the dying art of reading books among the people who will, in future, make watershed decisions about global warming, the classical concept of democracy and how to feed the poor. (And, of course, how much they would be...

Big Book Chain Chat #75 Young Adult Fiction: Write for the reader, not the age
Carina Diedericks-Hugo - 2011-08-11
Untitled Document It is with much delight that I have been following the discussions on books for young people. The genre seldom enjoys lively debate on the intricacies of writing for a market that is harder to pinpoint than Malema’s finances. I have been in the business for ten years and have laboured through 16 of my own YA books. As a publisher I have published more than 300 books for children and YAs. In fact, I have the honour of being able to claim the title as Sally Partridge’s...

Big Book Chain Chat #73 Young Adult Fiction: Pop culture and context in young adult fiction
SA Partridge - 2011-08-10
Untitled Document I came across fellow youth writer Maya Fowler’s piece on writing for youth (#25 Some thoughts on writing youth novels) and she made some very interesting points about pop culture: I’m not keen to populate my fiction with Hannah Montana-type characters or references to Jay-Z and the gang. But one can’t help feeling you should, just to get through … By adding that much of pop culture, mightn’t one overpopulate the work with detail in the same way...

Poetry: South African women writing their bodies
Gillian Schutte - 2011-08-10
Untitled Document There has been a proliferation of poetry coming out of South Africa over the past few years – and much of this poetry has been scribed by women writing their bodies. From the wants and needs of their vaginas to the conflicting emotions that a period may bring on, to the inner stirrings of desire and lust – women are writing it all down and lots of it is getting published. Says award-winning poet Arja Salafranca: “I think some of this has been due to the really...

Big Book Chain Chat #72 About writing memoirs and other things
Julian de Wette - 2011-07-20
Untitled Document Is apartheid a laughing matter? Set in 1960s South Africa, Prime Minister Verwoerd's assassination resonates throughout my novel, A Case of Knives, in which fictional Prime Minister Sybrand Schoon is murdered. The butler, Cyprian Molinieux, changed his racial classification from White to Coloured in order to marry a Coloured nanny. His love is unrequited and his subsequent attempts to regain his “European” identity drives him over the edge. He blames Schoon, the Prime...

Karen Lazar, author of Hemispheres – Inside a Stroke, in conversation with Janet van Eeden
Janet van Eeden - 2011-07-15
Title: Hemispheres – Inside a StrokeAuthor: Karen Lazar Publisher: Modjaji BooksISBN: 9781920397241 Click here to buy a copy from Kalahari.net. Review by Janet van Eeden Hemispheres – Inside a Stroke is another brave publication from Modjaji Books. Once again a woman whose life experiences are beyond the norm has been given a voice and Modjaji should be commended for continuing to showcase these unusual stories. Commendation is due even more to the author of this collection...

Clive Lawrance and My Barbados Hat
Janet van Eeden - 2011-06-30
Untitled Document Clive Lawrance’s new collection of poetry begins with a quote from WB Yeats: “Why should not old men be mad?” It’s a good question, one Lawrance feels in a position to answer. Now that he is in his seventies he doesn’t feel the need to justify what he does. Not that he ever did, mind. It’s just that his latest collection of poetry is his most honest, his most personal, and it is, as anything is that Lawrance does, unapologetic. “In the...

Independent Publishers: How do they survive?
Janet van Eeden - 2011-06-28
Untitled Document For some years I’ve wondered how on earth publishers survive in this less than literary country. Perhaps the one or two bestsellers like Spud can make up for the years of publishing books which won’t necessarily do as well. Then I began to think about independent publishers. How on earth do they manage to make ends meet when they have no back-up or a large stable of books to carry them through the tough times? I put these questions to Moira Richards and Norman Darlington,...

Big Book Chain Chat #71: VS Naipaul versus the World: Roses, thorns and dealing with pricks
Jonathan Amid - 2011-06-24
As I was reading the recent comments made about women’s writing and women writers by one VS Naipaul, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature no less, a quote from William Shakespeare’s beloved Romeo and Juliet came to mind: “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” When I heard what Naipaul had uttered about women’s writing and Jane Austen in particular, I was displeased to say the least. But was I shocked, surprised,...

100 Best books – readers’ vote as reflected in Cape Librarian
Francois Verster - 2011-06-22
Click here to view a list of the top 100 books of the past decade I’ve just got hold of the provincial library services magazine Cape Librarian (March/April edition) – as usual very interesting reading. According to a poll (2 000 library users were asked) the top 100 books of the past decade were listed in this edition. Of these 100 books I have read only eight. That was my first surprise. Twelve of them I still want to read – too many books ...And then I tried to recognise...

Big Book Chain Chat #70: VS Naipaul – a man from another time
Mike Rands - 2011-06-21
Untitled Document When Osama bin Laden was finally killed the Americans partied. From coast to coast they sang and danced and declared that it was a “great day to be alive”. People across the globe added their voices to the chorus. I was ashamed to be a human. In the quest for finding the bogeyman the greatest power the world has ever known bankrupted itself. Countries were plunged into war, and hundreds of thousands of people lost their lives. The man with the long beard and the...

Independent Publishers: How do they survive?
Janet van Eeden - 2011-06-21
Untitled Document Janet van Eeden in conversation with Mindy Stanford, Mariss Stevens and Crystal Warren of Aerial Publishing, a community publisher For some years I’ve wondered how on earth publishers survive in this less than literary country. Perhaps the one or two bestsellers like Spud can make up for the years of publishing books which won’t necessarily do as well. Then I began to think about independent publishers. How on earth do they manage to make ends meet when they have no...

Big Book Chain Chat #69: VS Naipaul’s recent rant – The last gasp of a moribund mindset
Fiona Snyckers - 2011-06-17
When something happens in the literary world that stirs me, I take to my blog at once. I find I can’t rest until my swirl of thoughts has been tamed, ordered and laid down neatly on the page. VS Naipaul’s recent rant against women writers was not one of these stirring events. I felt absolutely no compulsion to respond to it. Beyond a few moments of shocked incredulity, I stopped thinking about it almost at once. A few days later I read with great pleasure and amusement Finuala Dowling’s...

Big Book Chain Chat #68: Naipaul’s temerity carves into the heart of the matter
Janka Steenkamp - 2011-06-17
Upon reading VS Naipaul’s utterances about his clairvoyant ability to distinguish a writer’s gender by simply reading a paragraph, I was shocked beyond the realm of language; was this Nobel Prize for Literature winner really echoing Sir Robert Southey’s letter to Charlotte Brontë from 1837 who famously said, “Literature cannot be the business of a woman’s life, and ought not to be”? It would be ludicrously obvious to jump on to a feminist horse at this juncture...

Big Book Chain Chat #67: VS Naipaul's phallocratic utterances – Has he done us a favour by default?
Gillian Schutte - 2011-06-14
Untitled Document Well I’ll be damned, the blasted old bigot VS Naipaul has done it again. No stranger to literary spats and barneys, he seems to have little regard for current politically correct social norms, preferring the masculine “say it like it is” inclination of yesteryear. Not so long ago he disparaged all things African. This time the winner of the Nobel Prize for literature has lashed out at female authors, saying there is no woman writer whom he considers his equal...

Shortlist spotlight: M-Net Literary Awards 2011
2011-06-10
Shortlist: Category EnglishM-Net Literary Awards 2011 A selection of LitNet articles about the shortlisted books and writers Zoo City Lauren Beukes • Interview: Lauren Beukes on the SF tag and winning the British Arthur C Clark Award • Inter-review: Strap on your seatbelts – Janet van Eeden chats to Zoo City author Lauren Beukes • World Book Day: What made you fall in love with books? In a Strange Room Damon Galgut • We object: “I...

Photos: Sunday Times Literary Awards 2011 – shortlist announcement
Imke van Heerden - 2011-05-27
Many of South Africa’s literary greats and book lovers alike all gathered in Franschhoek mid-May for the shortlist announcement of the country’s pre-eminent literary accolade, the Sunday Times Literary Awards 2011. Click here for the shortlists. Click here for Q&A's with the shortlisted writers Some of the writers/publishers that attended the event (clockwise, from top left): Arja Salafranca, Leslie Swartz, Eugene Ashton, Robert Plummer, Henrietta Rose-Innes,...

Big Book Chain Chat #31: Making peace
Phillippa Yaa de Villiers - 2011-03-24
Untitled Document “What was the most difficult was the fact that I was forced to admit something I had always hidden from myself, which the American Negro has had to hide from himself at the price of his public progress; that I hated and feared white people. This did not mean that I loved black people; on the contrary, I despised them, possibly because they failed to produce Rembrandt. In effect, I hated and feared the world ...” (James Baldwin, Autobiographical Notes) In 2010 I had...

Shadows: Janet van Eeden enters the dark side with author Joan De La Haye
Janet van Eeden - 2011-02-16
Title: Shadows Author: Joan De La Haye Publisher: Generation Next Click here to order the e-book from Generation Next. Review by Janet van Eeden Joan De La Haye’s first novel, Shadows, delves into the very depths of the human psyche in all its guises and fulfils the demands of the horror genre to the full. The protagonist of Shadows, Sarah, begins to have apparent hallucinations soon after her father’s funeral. An evil-looking apparition materialises next to her while she is...

Big Book Chain Chat #30: Should writers censor what their characters say?
Janet van Eeden - 2011-02-03
Judge Edwin Cameron’s comment about John van de Ruit’s novel Spud being homophobic has initiated a debate in which many people agreed with the judge about apparently politically incorrect terminology used in the novel and film. It begs a response. The judge’s comment was sparked, it seems, by the character known as “The Guv” in Van de Ruit’s novel about an underdeveloped schoolboy who struggles to find his place in a very testosterone-charged boarding school....

pushing from the riverbank: Janet van Eeden talks to poet Alan Finlay
Janet van Eeden - 2011-01-26
Title: pushing from the riverbank Author: Alan Finlay Publisher: Dye Hard Press For details of where copies can be bought, contact Dye Hard Press or send them an email. Review by Janet van Eeden pushing from the riverbank is Alan Finlay’s latest collection of poetry. It deals with, amongst other things, the sensitive underbelly of a life in transition, of a man in the fluid space between identities as partner, father and writer. As such, the poet resonates with universal emotions,...

Big Book Chain Chat #29: Finding “the words to say it”
Estelle Neethling - 2011-01-06
Literary history has shown that writers come to their profession via diverse walks of life. Mine was a case of edging inexorably towards it along strange byways. I finally found my “voice” late in life, in my fifties. According to some opinions a human being’s true passion is usually the thing you are most excited about before the onset of adolescence. If this were true, I might have become an artist. I was always drawing as a child and could while away many an hour with a pencil...

Big Book Chain Chat #28: Googledocs, Googlebuzz, Googlechat – collaborative writing in New Media
Anton Krueger - 2011-01-04
Since I’ve been playing at writing, I’ve been waiting with breath duly bated for the emergence of my Voice. Yes, I’ve been patiently awaiting the arrival of my own distinctive tone by means of which to describe my particularly unique concerns to the world at large; but this year it struck me: I don’t have one. I’ve subsequently become drawn to the idea of collaborative writing; piggy-backing on the voices of others, or contributing to the invention of brand new...

Big Book Chain Chat #27: Sinew and bone
Ingrid Wolfaardt - 2010-12-14
Writers are frustrated artists and that’s bending it like Beckham with Picasso’s more eloquent way of putting it: “Often, while reading a book, one feels that the author would have preferred to paint, rather than write; one can sense the pleasure he derives from describing a landscape or a person as if he were painting because deep in his heart, he would have preferred to use brushes and colours.” To be fair, I find writers want to paint and painters want to write and...

Big Book Chain Chat #26: Hating poetry
Beverly Rycroft - 2010-12-09
“Poetry?” said Marianne Moore, “I, too dislike it.” A little arch, perhaps, for such a consummate poet, but you get the point. The reputation of poetry as obscure, irrelevant and inaccessible deters so many from enjoying what it can provide. The irony is, without our even being aware of it, poetry is skulking in the nooks and crannies of every part of our lives. We use it unconsciously. Think of things your mother told you, family phrases which get repeated and become entrenched....

Big Book Chain Chat #25: Some thoughts on writing youth novels
Maya Fowler - 2010-12-09
Recently I’ve been drawn into the world of youth novels, mainly through stumbling across competitions and being unable to resist entering. At first I asked myself how I could possibly write for this market. I certainly didn’t fit in when I was at the age in question, so now, with more than a decade (and counting …) between me and my potential readers, how could I engage them? As it happens, I’m not keen to populate my fiction with Hannah Montana-type characters or...

Debutants 2009/10: “De-monsterising the human” – Rupert Smith on his debut, Mettle
Rupert Smith - 2010-12-08
Title: Mettle Author: Rupert Smith Publisher: Andersen Books Date of publication: 2010 ISBN: 9780620488570 Price: R165.00 Mettle | Fiction Rupert Smith When Chris Mettle takes a job with mining magnate Shoes Mashaba his future is irrevocably altered. Mettle is caught between two worlds – the domestic bliss of a loving wife and two beautiful children, and the controversial life of being CEO of a mining company fast becoming insolvent. Eventually he is faced with the choice...

A conversation in a garden with Ingrid Andersen
Janet van Eeden - 2010-12-08
Rosehurst Cottage was once the lovingly tended home of eccentric Pietermaritzburg resident Lorraine Kettley. Kettley lived in the Victorian cottage with her husband for many years and after his death she resolved to reject the trappings of the 20th century. Legend has it that she stopped using electricity completely and chose to dress up only in Victorian clothes. She was a well-known figure, walking with her basket in her long gowns, to and from her cottage. Towards the end of her life she gave...

Big Book Chain Chat #23: Beware the digital wave
Eugene Ashton - 2010-12-02
There is talk of a revolution in the book business; readers and writers alike are working themselves into a frenzy. It is all very exciting. We are being told that the world as we know it is about to change, that the costs associated with moving books about the world will dissipate, and that cheaper, more easily accessible reading material is at hand. I don’t believe that for a moment. It would seem that the people who argue for the digital change often fail to grasp some of the essentials...

Big Book Chain Chat #22: Writer’s block
Rosamund Kendal - 2010-11-24
Five thousand words into my third novel I have hit writer’s block. It is a huge block, an insurmountable block, a behemoth of a block that I am completely unable to budge. I have tried all sorts of suggested remedies to shift my inertia. Instead of writing in my usual, very mundane, study, I have sought out quaint coffee shops hoping that they will provide an atmosphere conducive to reigniting my muse. I have spent a fortune on original Moleskine notepads praying that the soft, velvety pages...

Big Book Chain Chat #20: Learning to trust myself – sensory diaries and fiction-writing in prison
James Kilgore - 2010-11-16
I’m picking up on this notion of research for historical fiction raised by Craig Higginson and Louis Greenberg, but from a very different set of experiences. Sometime in early 2003 I decided to write a novel about 1980s Zimbabwe. I hadn’t been there in a couple of years, hadn’t lived there in more than a decade. But that shouldn’t have mattered. Novelists are supposed to be imaginative, to be able to remember how the sunlight filtered through the curtains or the smell of...

Transformative Voice and Silence in Neshani Andreas’s The Purple Violet of Oshaantu
Selene Delport - 2010-10-19
Title: The Purple Violet of Oshaantu Author: Neshani Andreas Publisher: Heinemann Educational Books ISBN: 9780435912086 Click here to buy a copy from Kalahari.net. Neshani Andreas’s1 first, and thus far only, novel, The Purple Violet of Oshaantu (2001), has elicited much praise from the literary world. Her publisher, Irene Staunton, describes Andreas as “a talented writer whose perspective, compassion and social conscience is [sic] needed” (in Von Wietersheim).Gagiano describes...


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