Hierdie is die LitNet-argief (2006–2012)
Besoek die aktiewe LitNet-platform by www.litnet.co.za

This is the LitNet archive (2006–2012)
Visit the active LitNet platform at www.litnet.co.za


 
Menings | Opinion > Onderhoude | Interviews > English

English


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Franschhoek Literary Festival 2010: Five questions I wish an interviewer would ask me
Michiel Heyns - 2010-05-13
We all know that writers are supposed to write about what they know. Why, then, are half your novels set in another country and another time? That depends on what you mean by know. Obviously in one way I know contemporary South Africa better than I know, say, Edwardian England – I know what it actually feels like to live here and now. But even this is partial – I don’t know what it’s like to live here and now for the vast majority of my fellow-citizens, and I have to use...

The author of This Place I Call Home, Meg Vandermerwe, in conversation with Janet van Eeden
Janet van Eeden - 2010-05-12
Title: This Place I Call HomeAuthor: Meg VandermerwePublisher: Modjaji BooksPages: 160ISBN: 9781920397029Click here to order This Place I Call Home from Kalahari.net.Short review by JvE Meg Vandermerwe has compiled an anthology of short stories told from the perspectives of a variety of people who live in South Africa. Each character speaks with a sharp clarity, his or her voice resonating long after the stories have been read. What Vandermerwe has done is to put together a kaleidoscope of characters...

Editor of Home Away, Louis Greenberg, in conversation with Janet van Eeden
Janet van Eeden - 2010-05-05
Title: Home AwayEditor: Louis GreenbergPublisher: Zebra PressPages: 256Format: SoftcoverISBN: 9781770220720Click here to order Home Away from Kalahari.net. Home Away is an entertaining read, with a selection of twenty-four short stories from South Africa’s finest writers (and some whose connections to South Africa are a little more tenuous). Each writer was given a time of day in which to set the story and so the collection takes the reader around the clock within twenty-four hours. The narratives...

Franschhoek Literary Festival 2010: Adam Schwartzman on his debut novel, Eddie Signwriter
Adam Schwartzman, Anna Mundow - 2010-05-03
Eddie Signwriter | Novel Adam Schwartzman A stunning debut novel – its power and prose evocative of such diverse writers as Faulkner, Ondaatje, Nabokov and Coetzee – about a young African’s international odyssey of self-discovery. Kwasi Edward Michael Dankwa – Eddie Signwriter to his clients – is a 20-year-old painter of murals and billboards in the city of Accra, Ghana, who is buffeted by forces beyond his control and understanding as he is swept up by the passions...

Trinity on Air author Fiona Snyckers in conversation with Janet van Eeden
Janet van Eeden - 2010-04-29
Title: Trinity on AirAuthor: Fiona SnyckersPublisher: Jonathan Ball Publishers SA ISBN: 9781868423651Format: Softcover Pages: 250Click here to purchase Trinity on Air from Kalahari.net! Short review by Janet van Eeden Trinity On Air sees Fiona Snyckers recreate the world of Trinity Luhabe, a girl with a father whose struggle credentials make Nelson Mandela look like a wannabe. Determined to make it on her own, she tries to find a job where she can put her Rhodes degree to good use. After all, she’s...

Franschhoek Literary Festival 2010: Self-interview
Wessel Ebersohn - 2010-04-29
The October Killings, your new thriller, was published last year. Before that, your last thriller, Closed Circle, was published in 1990. Will your readers have to wait another 19 years for the next one? Definitely not. In fact, the first draft of the next book, provisionally entitled Things That Love Night, has been finished for some months. The smoothing of the text and repairing of inconsistencies in the plot always take me some time. I expect to have it with my publisher, Frederik de Jager of...

On standby: A ''grounded'' Zoë Wicomb answers quick questions about her writing
Grace Kim - 2010-04-28
Zoë Wicomb recently came to South Africa by invitation of Stellenbosch University’s English Department and SOAS, University of London, who co-hosted a conference dedicated to her work The Cape and the Cosmopolitan: Reading Zoë Wicomb. Wicomb, who is South African-born but currently based in the UK, is the author of four highly acclaimed works of fiction: You Can’t Get Lost in Cape Town (1987), David’s Story (2001), Playing in the Light (2006) and The One That Got Away...

Franschhoek Literary Festival 2010: Self-interview
Zukiswa Wanner - 2010-04-21
You are known as a writer, but given that book sales are dismal in South Africa, what helps you pay the bills? I am that South African writer who has been trying to experiment with making a living out of what I love. Writing. So I write to pay bills. I write radio dramas, commissioned features, reviews, reader’s reports – put it this way, if it can be written and I can get paid from it, I will do it. Then I attend festivals like Franschhoek and use whatever money I make there to buy...

“Sharing particles”: Anton Krueger, author of Sunnyside Sal, in conversation with Janet van Eeden
Anton Krueger - 2010-03-09
Review by Janet van Eeden Anton Krueger’s first novella is a perceptive look into the world of two young boys whose changing hormones coincide with a country going through its own rebirth. Sal, the narrator, Andreas and a few other friends find themselves in an apartheid-style school during the last gasping years of the National Party’s reign. Forced to do camps at veld schools like all the other white children at that time, they find carrying logs and leopard crawling through mud...

The lion’s share: Imke van Heerden in conversation with Janet van Eeden on White Lion
Imke van Heerden - 2010-03-02
On the 19th of February local feature film White Lion leapt on to South Africa’s silver screen, collecting SAFTA nominations for Best Cinematography, Best Music Score and Best Sound Design along the way. Imke van Heerden asks a couple of quick questions to the co-writer of the script, LitNet contributor Janet van Eeden. Janet, White Lion is one of the most expensive movies ever made in South Africa. How did you get involved in this ambitious project? A call for scripts came through SASWA...

Zakes Mda, author of Black Diamond, in conversation with Janet van Eeden
Zakes Mda - 2009-12-17
Mini review of Black Diamond Black Diamond, Zakes Mda’s latest novel, is a most incisive portrayal of post-democracy South Africa. Mda has created a cast of characters that epitomises the vast spectrum of our colourful society with all its foibles and quirks. Black Diamond is an affectionate and honest portrayal of South African society by a man who loves his country enough not to let it become the victim of its own success. JvE: Your satirical voice is well known through your many successful...

James Kilgore, author of We are All Zimbabweans Now, in conversation with Janet van Eeden
Janet van Eeden - 2009-11-12
Minireview We are all Zimbabweans Now is a book written by James Kilgore while he was serving time in prison. Kilgore was a militant activist in America in the ’70s who escaped the authorities for twenty years by living in exile in Africa. As a fugitive he spent time in Zimbabwe and then South Africa until he was extradited to the United States in 2002. When he was finally incarcerated, he wrote this novel, based strongly on his experiences in post-liberation Zimbabwe.Kilgore’s...

Tessa Dowling on Prof Jansen's plea for multilingualism
Tessa Dowling - 2009-11-11
The new vice-chancellor at the University of the Free State, Prof Jonathan Jansen, said in his inaugural address, "In 2010 I will open discussion on ways in which we can get every white student to learn Sesotho or Setswana and every black student to learn Afrikaans ..." Do you think this is just wishful thinking, or is it entirely possible?It is entirely possible! Learning a language is just a matter of wanting to say something, finding out how to say it in the new language, and then saying...

Orphaned Latitudes: Herman Wasserman in conversation with Gérard Rudolf
Herman Wasserman - 2009-11-05
Gérard Rudolf’s first book, Orphaned Latitudes, appeared this month, published by Red Squirrel Press in the UK. (Order at http://redsquirrelpress.com.) He spoke to Herman Wasserman about finding oneself in alien territory. You are well known as an actor in South Africa. Now here is your first book. How did it come about – was it a project that simmered on the sidelines for a long time, a creative switch from one art form to another, something else? First off: I don’t...

Self-interview: Writer Petina Gappah on understanding Zimbabwe
Petina Gappah - 2009-10-27
When did you first start writing?I wrote my first "novel" when I was about 11; it was called Return to Planet Earth!. Set in 2020, which was the far distant future to me then, Return to Planet Earth! was the story of a group of convicts who escape from a penal colony on Mars and return to Planet Earth for revenge and havoc. To my lasting heartbreak, the book and other scribblings were all mistakenly burnt as rubbish. My first published work was in the St Dominic's school magazine when...

Toyota Enviro Outreach: In converation with Theresa Sowry
Naomi Bruwer - 2009-10-02
What is the Southern African Wildlife College (SAWC)? What training do you provide and how many students are involved? The SAWC was established in 1997 by the World Wide Fund for Nature, South Africa (WWF-SA) with money obtained from the German government, and with the support of major conservation stakeholders both within South Africa and regionally across the Southern African Developing community (SADC). The College is a Section 21 company (not for profit) and operated initially with financial...

The author of House of War, Hamilton Wende, in conversation with Janet van Eeden
Hamilton Wende - 2009-09-23
Hamilton Wende has written a fast-paced thriller, full of intrigue and action, to rival the best thriller novels out there. Its subject matter is internationally topical, set in war-torn Afghanistan, and yet its roots are firmly embedded in Southern African soil. Sebastian is a troubled man. While he is growing up in the bush war of pre-democratic Rhodesia, a traumatic incident in his childhood leaves him with an indelible scar. He finds solace in his work, concentrating on the life of Alexander...

Editors Gary Cummiskey and Eva Kowalska in conversation with Janet van Eeden
Janet van Eeden - 2009-09-16
Who Was Sinclair Beiles?JvE: I found Who Was Sinclair Beiles? a fascinating read. It was so interesting to read about Sinclair Beiles, someone I didn't know much about, from so many different perspectives. The interviews between Beiles and Gary Cummiskey and Beiles and dawie malan especially throw much light on the nature of the man himself. The essays by Cummiskey, malan, Earle Holmes, Alan Finlay, Eva Kowalska, George Dillon Slater and Fred de Vries serve to delve behind the man's words...

Google and the South African author
Bertus Preller - 2009-09-03
Authors! Did you know that September 4th is your opt-out deadline for the Google Book Settlement? 4th September, 2009 – this Friday – is an important date for authors and publishers worldwide. Following Google’s announcement of its Library Project in 2004, rumours of South African books being electronically scanned by Google teams in local libraries have been flying about. What are the implications of Google’s ambitious Library Project, and where will it leave...

Interview with Fiona Snyckers
Janet van Eeden - 2009-08-12
Trinity Rising is a great, light-hearted read about Trinity Luhabe who is in her first year at Rhodes University. It's fun to read, especially for old Rhodians like me. I loved reading about my favourite places in Grahamstown. But Trinity isn't your average romantic hero. As you describe her in your synopsis: She's got looks. She's got brains (sort of). She's got ambition. Trinity is a girl with a plan. It's not a plan she'll share with just anyone, especially...

Naomi Meyer in conversation with Sarah Waters
2009-07-15
Sarah Waters (www.sarahwaters.com) was born in Wales in 1966. She has a PhD in English literature and has been an associate lecturer with the Open University. She has won a Betty Trask Award and the Somerset Maugham Award and was twice shortlisted for the Mail on Sunday / John Llewellyn Rhys Prize. In 2003 she was named Author of the Year three times: by the British Book Awards, The Booksellers’ Association and Waterstone’s Booksellers. She was also chosen as one of Granta's Best...

Malika Ndlovu on her memoir Invisible Earthquake: a Woman’s Journal through Stillbirth – In Conversation with Janet van Eeden
Janet van Eeden - 2009-07-01
Title: Invisible Earthquake: a Woman's Journal through StillbirthAuthor: Malika NdlovuPublisher: Modjaji BooksISBN: 9780980272932Publication date: February 2009Pages: 88Click here to order your copy of Invisible Earthquake from Kalahari.net.Thank you Malika, for this very beautiful and personal description of what it is like to give birth to a stillborn baby. I found it deeply moving and evocative of grief in all its guises. What was it that made you decide to write about the very personal experience...

Big Dan’s Sofie by Keith Cornelis-Britz nominated for EU Literary Award
Darryl David - 2009-06-24
In the summer of 2006, after writing in The Witness about my travels to Arniston, I received an e-mail from a total stranger who wanted to talk to me. Curious, I agreed and we met after my lecture on the local campus of UKZN. There I saw a pony-tailed gentleman of an age where men should not have pony tails, looking as if he was waiting for someone. “Keith?” I ask, and extend my hand sheepishly. We shake hands. He explains that in my article I said I went to Arniston on the strength...

Engela Neethling interviews mercenary journalist Al J Venter
Al J Venter - 2009-02-25
War correspondent, author of several books and documentary filmmaker Al J Venter has been spending the past few months in Port Alfred, completing his latest book. Venter looks back on a long and eventful life of living and working as a war correspondent throughout Africa, often with a rifle in one hand and a camera in the other. Sunshine Coast’s shores have been graced with the presence of Al J Venter, renowned war correspondent and author of several books on the subject of guerrilla warfare...

In conversation with Tracey Farren, author of Whiplash
Janet van Eeden - 2008-11-12
Tell me a little bit about your background. You are a freelance journalist and have an honours degree in psychology. What made you choose to write a novel, and then why did you focus specifically on a novel about prostitutes in Cape Town? For a few years I wrote newspaper pieces about social and governance issues, like child justice and prison conditions. I was especially interested in the decriminalisation of prostitution debate. It was easy for me to research the issue as I lived in the pretty...

Mike Rands on Byron, comedy and writing as an artform
Mike Rands - 2008-11-06
Title: Praise Routine Number 4 Author: Mike RandsPublisher: Human & Rousseau (Pty) LtdISBN: 9780798150033Publication date: August 2008Pages: 296Click here to buy Praise routine number 4 from Kalahari.net now! Byron Winterleaf, a 23-year-old white guy, is on the verge of losing his job as a translator at a Xhosa-themed restaurant. And during heavy rains his back garden in Observatory, Cape Town, is flooded, exposing a bone, that much is clear, but whose? Susan Ridge, head...

Karen Jennings interviews Ingrid Wolfaardt on her debut novel, Heartfruit
Karen Jennings - 2008-10-22
Title: HeartfruitAuthor: Ingrid WolfaardtPublisher: Human & RousseauISBN: 9780798149938Pages: 456Click here to buy Heartfruit from Kalahari.net now! Heartfruit was originally written in fulfilment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Creative Writing at the University of Cape Town. What was it that attracted you to this programme and made you decide to register, rather than writing on your own?I had been trying to write sensibly for approximately six months, that is write with the...

In conversation with Modjaji Books publisher, Colleen Higgs
Janet van Eeden - 2008-10-21
You named your publication after the Sesotho rain queen, Modjaji. You've said that you chose this name as you were called Pulani, Daughter of the Rain Queen, as a child. Please can you explain how this transformed into Modjaji Books, and what the implications of the name are for you? I had decided to start publishing and then began thinking about a name that would encapsulate what I hoped to do and achieve. The name Modjaji Books came to me while I was driving home from work on De Waal Drive....

Interview: Eben Venter’s Trencherman
2008-10-15
Charles Malan interviewed Eben Venter, who is temporarily living in Australia, about Trencherman, the translation of his novel Horrelpoot. Let’s talk about the reception and implications of the translation. One of the earliest reviews, by Leon de Kock, can set the stage: "Published in Afrikaans in 2006 as Horrelpoot – to wide critical acclaim, and to some controversy, too – it is quite simply the most devastating fictional account of apocalyptic South African collapse...

Poet or publisher? Janet van Eeden meets Gary Cummiskey of Dye Hard Press
Janet van Eeden - 2008-09-30
The 12th Poetry Africa International Poetry Festival takes place in Durban from the 29 September to 4 October 2008. One of the featured poets is Gary Cummiskey. I asked Gary a few questions about his writing, as well as his publishing through his press, Dye Hard Press. You have been writing for most of your life, haven't you Gary? Is your desire to write a need to change history or make a mark on the world in some way?The first thing I ever wrote was a short story about Mary, Queen of Scots,...

A Wild Coast tale
Engela Neethling - 2008-09-16
PORT ALFRED - Childhood memories of endless holidays on golden beaches, swims in mermaid pools and carefree days spent in seaside resorts prompted Clive Dennison to pen down his fondest times on the Wild Coast in book form. The result was A Brief History of the Wild Coast, a soft-cover book with photos and anecdotes of the "old Transkei", which has just been published. The book, a must read for all who have ever had the opportunity to visit or live on the Wild Coast, is sold directly by...

Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards: 10 quick questions to Conny Masocha Lubisi
Naomi Bruwer - 2008-08-27
Maskew Miller Longman has announced the winners of its 2008 Literature Award competition for writing in all South Africa’s official languages. This year’s competition focused on youth dramas. Conny Masocha Lubisi won the Xisonga category with his drama Mangwa. Naomi Bruwer asked him 10 quick questions. What does a competition such as the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award contribute to creative writing in South Africa? Did the competition motivate you to write Mangwa? A...

Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards: 10 quick questions to PF Kekane
Naomi Bruwer - 2008-08-27
Maskew Miller Longman has announced the winners of its 2008 Literature Award competition for writing in all South Africa’s official languages. This year’s competition focused on youth dramas. PF Kekane won the isiZulu category with his drama Isihlahla Sendlena. Naomi Bruwer asked him 10 quick questions. What does a competition such as the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award contribute to creative writing in South Africa? Did the competition motivate you to write Isihlahla...

Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards: 10 quick questions to Teboho Letshaba
Naomi Bruwer - 2008-08-27
Maskew Miller Longman has announced the winners of its 2008 Literature Award competition for writing in all South Africa’s official languages. This year’s competition focused on youth dramas. Teboho Letshaba won the Sesotho category with his drama Nthunyakgare. Naomi Bruwer asked him 10 quick questions. What does a competition such as the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award contribute to creative writing in South Africa? Did the competition motivate you to write Nthunyakgare?...

Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards: 10 quick questions to Domina Napoleon Munzhelele
Naomi Bruwer - 2008-08-26
Maskew Miller Longman has announced the winners of its 2008 Literature Award competition for writing in all South Africa’s official languages. This year’s competition focused on youth dramas. Domina Napoleon Munzhelele won the Tshivenda category with his drama Bodzandala. Naomi Bruwer asked him 10 quick questions. What does a competition such as the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award contribute to creative writing in South Africa? Did the competition motivate you to write...

Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards: 10 quick questions to N Tutani
Naomi Bruwer - 2008-08-26
Maskew Miller Longman has announced the winners of its 2008 Literature Award competition for writing in all South Africa’s official languages. This year’s competition focused on youth dramas. N Tutani won the isiXhosa category with his drama Gawulayo! Gawulayo! Naomi Bruwer asked him 10 quick questions. What does a competition such as the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award contribute to creative writing in South Africa? The competition has motivated me a great deal. It...

Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards: 10 quick questions to Kobelo Stephen Naledi
Naomi Bruwer - 2008-08-26
Maskew Miller Longman has announced the winners of its 2008 Literature Award competition for writing in all South Africa’s official languages. This year’s competition focused on youth dramas. Kobelo Stephen Naledi won the Setswana category with his drama Maikotlhao. Naomi Bruwer asked him 10 quick questions. What does a competition such as the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award contribute to creative writing in South Africa? A competition such as the Maskew Miller Literature...

Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards: 10 quick questions to Charles J Fourie
Naomi Bruwer - 2008-08-26
Maskew Miller Longman has announced the winners of its 2008 Literature Award competition for writing in all South Africa’s official languages. This year’s competition focused on youth dramas. Charles J Fourie won the English category with his drama The Lighthouse Keeper’s Wife. Naomi Bruwer asked him 10 quick questions. What does a competition such as the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award contribute to creative writing in South Africa? The MML competition is open...

Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards: 10 quick questions to Charles J Fourie
Naomi Bruwer - 2008-08-26
Maskew Miller Longman has announced the winners of its 2008 Literature Award competition for writing in all South Africa’s official languages. This year’s competition focused on youth dramas. Charles J Fourie won the English category with his drama The Lighthouse Keeper’s Wife. Naomi Bruwer asked him 10 quick questions. What does a competition such as the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award contribute to creative writing in South Africa? The MML competition is open...

Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards: 10 quick questions to Charles J Fourie
Naomi Bruwer - 2008-08-26
Maskew Miller Longman has announced the winners of its 2008 Literature Award competition for writing in all South Africa’s official languages. This year’s competition focused on youth dramas. Charles J Fourie won the English category with his drama The Lighthouse Keeper’s Wife. Naomi Bruwer asked him 10 quick questions. What does a competition such as the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award contribute to creative writing in South Africa? The MML competition is open...

Wordsetc – A literary magazine for the 21st century
Janet van Eeden - 2008-08-22
Two copies of the Literary Magazine Wordsetc landed on my desk recently, and I was impressed by the professional look of this publication. It’s a well put together magazine with in-depth feature articles about writers by writers. Unlike many of the literary journals which have been around for a long time and which are sometimes put together without much finesse, this publication has the look of, and reads like, a quality magazine. The latest edition honours women, fittingly in Women’s...

Interview with Damon Galgut: Intro
Haydee Morgan-Hollander - 2008-08-05
The ImpostorDamon Galgut ISBN: 9780143025733 Softcover Penguin SA R160.00The Booker-shortlisted Damon Galgut (2003) is a playwright and novelist living in Cape Town. Born in Pretoria, Galgut studied drama at the University of Cape Town, debuting with his first novel, A Sinless Season, in 1984 at the age of seventeen. Other works include Small Circle of Beings (1988), The...

Interview with Damon Galgut: Childhood memories and the effects of cancer
Haydee Morgan-Hollander - 2008-08-05
"It remains the central, cataclysmic event of my life. The need to write came out of that, because on some level I associated books and reading with love and attention. It was the only thing I ever really wanted to do." – Damon Galgut on being read to as a sick child, The Observer, 2003 Galgut is an unusual name. Tell us something of your family origins?I don’t know too much about our family tree. On my mother’s side, the family came out from England about three generations...

Interview with Damon Galgut: Words (his own) and those of others
Haydee Morgan-Hollander - 2008-08-05
It was better to talk while the urgency was there. (The Impostor, p 17) How much of Small Circle of Beings is autobiographical? The family whose members, despite the lack of alternative company, remain hopelessly alienated from one another?The basic shape of the story is very close to home, but a lot of defining details have been altered. We never lived in the countryside, for example, and I didn’t have a mad grandmother in the back garden. I also softened a lot of the ugliness – a great...

Interview with Damon Galgut: Adaptation and poetry
Haydee Morgan-Hollander - 2008-08-05
He never looks at Adam directly in these moments, but stares off at a slant, a cigarette glowing at the corner of his mouth like a lit fuse. (The Impostor, p 95) On p 18 of The Impostor you write, "As a young man, Adam had published a book of poems. The collection had been called The flaming sword, a title he had taken from Genesis." As a title, The Impostor has certain filmic qualities. Do you hope to have this book turned into a movie as well?I don’t write a book with the hope...

Interview with Damon Galgut: Pastimes
Haydee Morgan-Hollander - 2008-08-05
Why do our thoughts turn to some gesture of a hand, the fall of a sleeve, some corner of a room on a particular anonymous afternoon, even when we are asleep, and even when we are so old that our thoughts have abandoned other business? What are all these fragments for, if not to be knit up finally? – Housekeeping, Marilynne Robinson What book do you give to the person who has read everything?Well, if this person has really read everything, there’s no point in giving him or her a book....

Interview with Damon Galgut: Ironies
Haydee Morgan-Hollander - 2008-08-05
Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality, but an escape from personality. But of course, only those who have personality and emotions know what it means to want to escape from these things. – TS Eliot, “Tradition and the Individual Talent, II", The Sacred Wood, 1922 On p 20 of The Impostor Adam says, "Maybe the soul of South Africa wasn’t a poet; maybe it was a crooked property developer, obsessed with...

When a computer becomes a murder weapon – Barbara Erasmus on Chameleon
Janet van Eeden - 2008-07-02
Order your copy op Chameleon at Kalahari.net by clicking on the book’s cover.Your first book, Kaleidoscope, dealt with Asperger's syndrome and autism. It got very good reviews and hopefully sold quite well. What made you turn to the crime writing genre in this, your third book?Unfortunately the good reviews didn’t result in a stampede to the tills and neither Kaleidoscope nor Even with Insects has shown any sign of joining Spud and Jake White's book on the best-seller list. I decided...

Bright Lights, Bleak City: in conversation with Lauren Beukes
Michelle McGrane - 2008-06-18
Born in 1976 in Johannesburg, Lauren Beukes received her MA in Creative Writing from the University of Cape Town. Maverick: Extraordinary Women from South Africa's Past (Oshun) was nominated for the Sunday Times 2006 Alan Paton non-fiction award. Her short stories have been published in various anthologies, including Open (Oshun), African Road: New Writing from Southern Africa (New Africa) and 180 Degrees (Oshun). Moxyland, Lauren's first novel, has recently been published by Jacana. ...

A conversation with Megan Hall
Michelle McGrane - 2008-06-11
Of mongrel ancestry? Megan Hall may think so, but poetry lovers certainly don't! Photo: Stephen Lamb Megan Hall was born and grew up in Cape Town and studied at the University of Cape Town. She has worked in the publishing industry since 1995 and is currently publishing manager for dictionaries and school literature in English at Oxford University Press Southern Africa. Her poetry has appeared in various local journals since 1991, as well as in the school anthology Worldscapes. A short story...


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